The Best Gerber Knives – Pocket-Sized Swords

Perhaps you’ve been looking into getting yourself a nice shiny Benchmade knife but were stopped by the triple-digit prices. Despite the fact that you usually get what you pay for, it can often seem unreasonable to pay more than a Franklin for a pocket knife. And that’s where Gerber steps in.

Not to be confused with the baby product brand (by Daniel Gerber), Gerber Legendary Blades was founded in 1939 by Pete Gerber and was the first company to collaborate with a custom knife maker, which is now commonplace. The company is headquartered in Tigard, Oregon where they continue to make knives and multitools.

Gerber receives all kinds of mixed feedback from consumers. Some would say their knives are tough and last a lifetime while others say most of their knives are faulty and unreliable. Whatever the case, Gerber knives are usually very affordable and definitely worth a shot. And if you ask me, I would say every knife company will eventually produce a few defective blades, but that doesn’t make them a bad company.

That said, let’s take a look at some of the best Gerber knives on the market, all of which are well below the three-digit price tag.

Gerber Freeman Folder

SIZE
WEIGHT

The Freeman is a nice, sturdy knife that’s got a whole lot of chunk to it. It’s a folding blade based on an older fixed-blade knife by the same name. This knife may not have the same strength as its precursor, but it will certainly come through when you need it to.

The blade is made of a fairly basic steel and has a rubberized handle for extra grip. Its simple drop point tip makes this a great tool for almost any task. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have a pocket clip, so it may not be the best pocket companion. It does include a holster, though, in case you’re That said, it does have a very reasonable price tag, so the Freeman is definitely one folder to consider.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

8.1 inches
4.5 inches
5Cr15MoV steel
rubberized stainless steel
6.6 ounces
~$30

Gerber Paraframe Mini

Size
WEIGHT

Here’s a knife that’s good at not being heavy. Various shapes are cut out of the handle presumably to help reduce the weight and apparently it works. The Paraframe Mini is a smaller version of the original Paraframe and, at only three inches long, may even be too small for some people to use comfortably.

The materials used are as basic as you can get, but this knife wasn’t made to be a hundred-dollar cutter. You could say that this is a really good cheap knife because it’s one of the least expensive knives on the market. So, if you’re just testing the waters with the whole pocket knife business or need a more disposable tool for your EDC, then the Paraframe Mini is almost impossible to go wrong with.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

5.3 inches
3.1 inches
stainless steel
stainless steel
1.4 ounces
~$10

Gerber E-Z Out

Size
Weight

Although the name may seem to suggest that the designers opted for the path of least resistance, it actually refers to how easy it is to get the knife open. This is achieved with the stylish holes along the spine of the blade that help your finger pull it out. It’s one of Gerber’s more popular models mostly because of the simplicity.

The blade has a normal shape and a bead blast finish (it was blasted with fine glass beads to remove imperfections), so it’ll be able to handle moderate tasks without a problem. It’s also really light, so you can easily forget about it in your pocket. The E-Z Out is definitely a tool to consider if you’re looking for a standard pocket knife on a budget.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.9 inches
4.6 inches
stainless steel
polycarbonate
3.0 ounces
~$30

Gerber EAB Lite

 

Size
Weight

First of all, can we just talk about how this thing looks? It seems like it should be able to do a lot more than just cut things, almost like something out of a sci-fi film. Of course, being as dirt cheap as it is, this thing can’t do much more than fold up.

This knife is special in that it doesn’t have a dedicated blade, but rather takes a standard utility blade. This means that if you drop the thing from your roof onto concrete and chip the blade, you can just replace it without having to buy a whole new knife. If course, that also means the blade won’t be made from high quality material, but if you’re more prone to having your blade chipped, then the EAB is a good, cheap tool for the job.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

5.1 inches
2.8 inches
replaceable utility blade
stainless steel
2.5 ounces
~$10

Gerber Gator

 

Size
Weight

Have you ever wanted a knife that looks like an alligator? Well, not only does this thing look like one, it also has a handle that’s weather resistant. And since alligators are also weather resistant, I guess that means they’re basically the same thing. At any rate, this knife will take anything you throw at it (it may or may not also tear it to pieces).

There have been complaints about how hard this thing is to open with one hand, so it might not be the best thing for a quick draw. However, it’s a perfect tool for any rugged expedition where your blade will be exposed to the elements. It also has a moderate clip-point tip for all your tooth-picking needs. The Gerber Gator would make an invaluable addition to any adventurer’s pocket.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

8.5 inches
5.0 inches
high-carbon stainless steel
thermoplastic
4.3 ounces
~$40

Gerber Prodigy Fixed-Blade

Size
Weight

This one won’t exactly fit in your pocket, but you can’t mention Gerber Legendary Blades without bringing up one of their fixed-blade knives. The Prodigy is one of their smallest and most popular fixed-blades and the little brother to the renowned Infantry LMF II, which is not something to mess around with (and neither is this one).

The Prodigy is equipped with super tough steel and a durable rubber-coated handle to ensure maximum performance. It’s big enough to mean business and small enough to reasonably keep hanging on your belt or hiding in a boot. And the sheath itself is above average to say the least. It allows to you to lock the knife in place without having to strap anything to the handle, which makes it easy to whip out in an emergency. The Gerber Prodigy is definitely a knife to look into if you want your knife to be unflinching.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

9.7 inches
N/A
420HC steel
rubber-coated metal
7.2 ounces
~$50

Gerber LST

Size
Weight

This knife really takes a step back with its old-timey appearance, but don’t let that fool you—it’s as tough as can be. Granted, it’s not exactly a survival knife, but that doesn’t mean it couldn’t last you a lifetime. For general uses around the house, the LST would be a star.

Made of pretty basic materials, this knife is the lightest one on the list and is perfect to stick anywhere you can find a place for it. You could even tie string through the keychain hole to make it easier to grab and harder to lose. I won’t sell you a dog—if a classic is what you’re looking for, then step right up and give the LST a good run for its money.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

6.2 inches
3.5 inches
high-carbon steel
fiberglass-nylon
1.2 ounces
~$20

Gerber Key Note

Size
Weight

This may not look like much more than a glorified letter opener, but it packs more of a punch than you’d think. It’s also a bit bigger than you might expect. Whatever it is, though, it’s hard to argue with its chonky look.

To be fair, you probably won’t be able to cut much more than a thin piece of cardboard given how difficult it would be to get a firm grip and the tiny handle. It’s also a little on the spendy side for how small it is; but don’t get me wrong—the Key Note is a great knife for lightweight tasks and there’s hardly a more unique way to go about it. So if you need something to clip onto your keychain or stick on your backpack, then definitely check out this tiny thing of a tool.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

3.0 inches
2.0 inches
5Cr steel
aluminum
3.0 ounces
~$20

Those have been some of the best Gerber knives you’ll ever get your hands on (or at least put in your pockets). With one of these things in your possession, maybe you won’t feel so bad about getting it all dirty and grimy, which would probably not be the case with the more expensive blades. And plus, if you pick up a few of them, you can lend them to a friend guilt-free, assuming they’re brainy enough to use it to pull nails from the living room wall.

Hopefully you found this article helpful. If you have any questions of concerns (or just like typing things), then be sure to leave a comment below and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

8 thoughts on “The Best Gerber Knives – Pocket-Sized Swords

  1. Notwithstanding the comment that I made on one of your other posts re pocket knives,I have to applaud you for your endorsement of Gerber products. I was a soldier for over 40 years and  I had a Gerber pocket knife and a Gerber multi tool which served me well for over 30 of them, I used the knife nearly every day for one thing or another before it finally gave up its edge after a long and faithful life. The multi tool I have to this day.

    Thanks for the post

    Hamish

    1. Hi Hamish,

      That’s incredible! Just more evidence that things back in the day were built to last a lifetime or two. Whatever knife you had was clearly built for the long term. Of course, if anybody wants their knife to last a long time, it’s important to keep it clean and running smoothly.

  2. Hello there! This is an awesome review you’ve got here. I admire the features of these knives but for me, I prefer the “Gerber E-Z Out” as the price is fair and it not that heavy to carry around as a security personnel. 

    Thanks for sharing this details, I’ll place my order as soon as I receive my salary.

    1. Hi Chimmhogevagreenesnr,

      I’m glad you found this to be helpful! The Gerber E-Z Out is definitely a nice and simple option for anyone who’s not well acquainted with pocket knives. It’s affordable and easy to stick in your pocket.

  3. Hello there,

    Like you said in the production of metals there might be some that might not be good but that doesn’t mean that all the products are bad. 

    Peter Gerber did a Good job by providing us with pocket-sized knives that are of high quality and affordable.

    i really appreciated the “Gerber EAB Lite” because it is way affordable and if the knife gets bad you don’t have to buy the whole knife, the steel can be replaced.

    1. Hi Lizzy,

      Often times a few bad instances with a company or product will spread and seem bigger than all the good things about it. I suppose that’s the way with the internet, though. I do really like the EAB lite for the same reason since you can just replace the blade. It’s perfect for opening boxes and other light tasks.

  4. This is a pretty nice and well presented article on Gerber knives. Over the years, Gerber knives company have always produced the best of most beautiful pocket knives, although, its a fact that every knife company will eventually produce a few defective blades, but that doesn’t make them a bad company and that has always been the case of Gerber knives.
    One might be really confused on the choice to make when trying to get a well built knife and thats where this article comes in to present to you the best of the best from which you can easily make a choice

    1. Hi Evans,

      It would be foolish to pass up a company because of a few defects and Gerber is definitely one of those companies. When buying something, it can be difficult to make a decision due to how many options are out there, so it’s always good to narrow them down.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *